Doing Microdermabrasion At Home and Why

Acne is a skin condition that affects the majority of people who are between 12 and 25 years of age. However, there are more adults who are experiencing acne or are suffering from the scars of acne from earlier years. Micro-dermabrasion is one weapon in the war against acne scars which addresses the current problem, as well as any past scars, wrinkles and fine lines. (1)

Micro-dermabrasion has been available in the United States since 1998. Originally, it was developed in Italy as an evolution of the dermabrasion technique. Dermabrasion was a surgical procedure which require general anesthesia because of the aggressive nature of the protocol. During the procedure the doctor used a tool which was similar to an electric sander and essentially took off the upper layers of skin. Recovery from this procedure was very painful and usually lengthy. (2)

Today, researchers have simplified the process using a different tool and a different procedure called micro-dermabrasion. It is nonchemical and noninvasive and does not require anesthesia. In fact, some patients return to work the afternoon of the procedure. Research has shown that micro-dermabrasion will reduce the appearance of acne scars from the surface of the skin and the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Some dermatologists also recommend microdermabrasion to reduce the appearance of large pores.

During the procedure a dermatologist uses a fine aluminum crystal to lighten the skin of the affected area. This is followed quickly by sander with a vacuum. The crystals will gently a brave the surface and with mild suction will exfoliate the skin revealing a smoother, thicker dermis.

Dermatologists will often recommend progressive treatments for improved results when targeting wrinkles, fine lines, scars and stretch marks. Most patients report immediate and noticeable results after the first treatment and continuing improvements in the following days. Patients also report that there are little to no side effects and minimal discomfort from the procedure. (3)

Interestingly this procedure also improves blood flow to the area, decreases pigmentation and improves the appearance of cellulite. Research has also shown that it improves the look of large pores, blackheads, whiteheads, acne scars, stretch marks, uneven tone, fine lines and wrinkles.

This particular procedure is also more affordable than other acne skin treatments. One of the benefits is that it can be done at home. Products sold for home use have three different levels. On the first level of product will have only the first step, or the lightening crystals. The next level product will include the cream and a rehydrating material and the third level product the individual will also receive mechanical electrical equipment.

Prices range from $25-$200 depending upon the level of products being ordered. The price of the product with the equipment is higher but individuals report much better results. Before using a product at home check with your dermatologists to be sure that your skin type will receive this procedure well. For instance, those individuals who have high amounts of melanin in their skin will not want to attempt to a micro-dermabrasion because of the potential for scar tissue.

Micro-dermabrasion used for acne scars is a safer and more cost-effective alternative for treatment than others may be. It’s available for use at the office of the dermatologist or even at home and is relatively painless with no side effects. Micro-dermabrasion is something to try if you are plagued by scars, trying to improve the condition of your skin or attempting to decrease the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.
(1) American Academy of Dermatology: Microdermabrasion
http://www.skincarephysicians.com/agingskinnet/microdermabrasion.html

(2) University of Maryland Medical Center: Skin Wrinkles and Blemishes
http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/what_implant_procedures_reducing_wrinkles_000021_6.htm

(3) Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology: Microdermabrasion: A Molecular Analysis Following a Single Treatment
http://www.eblue.org/article/S0190-9622%2804%2902739-2/abstract

 

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